The Little Deaf And Dumb Preacher





In a small town in Germany lived a locksmith and his wife, to whom God

had given one child, a girl, who rejoiced the hearts of her parents as

she grew up strong and happy. But the father longed for a son, and God

heard his prayer, and a boy was born to him. Now indeed there was joy in

the home; but their happiness was soon saddened, for the child was found

to be deaf and dumb. He was otherwise a beautiful boy, with large blue

eyes. What could they do for him but pray?



"Ah, if only the Lord Jesus was here now," spoke the father once, "how

would I seek Him, and bring our child to Him; how would I pray Him to

lay His hand on our dear child, too, and give him hearing."



"And I know He certainly would," the mother answered.



"But the Lord Jesus is with us, though we see Him not; let us entreat

Him for our child."



At length the boy was three years old. His eyes were full of

intelligence, and he seemed to understand everything around him. The

God-fearing habits of his parents had a great influence over him. At

family prayer the mother held the little one on her lap, his hands

clasped together, and when the father asked a blessing on their frugal

meal, the little child would also stand behind his stool, and would

never taste a morsel before it was asked.



It was advised that the boy be placed under the care of a famous

physician in a neighbouring town. The father would leave untried nothing

possible for the welfare of his boy, and so very soon set out on his

journey. The sun was already set when they reached their destination.



Then the father took the boy's hand, and they went together to a

relative's who lived in the town. But what a different home from that

which the boy had left: the relative did not believe in the Word of God,

but only thought of pleasure and doing according to his own wisdom. So

long as the father was with him the child was content. He would not move

from his side, and at night slept locked in his arms. But the father

could not stay long; pressing business compelled his return home. His

departure was very sorrowful for the child, and the father felt it no

less.



At length the dinner time came. All was prepared, and the family

gathered round the table, and with a good appetite began the meal. But

the dumb child sat not; he stood behind his chair and waited. The others

told him to sit and eat, but he understood not. His lips were

speechless, but he made signs that they should pray. The people

understood him, but would not show they did. Then the child ran to each,

and, with a supplicating look, tried to clasp their hands together. A

feeling of shame came over them. They wished to quiet him, but dared

not try. Should they pray? They had never done it, but the child waited.

At length the wife stood up, then the husband, and then all the others,

for they did not know what else to do, and the wife prayed, with

trembling voice, "Lord Jesus, come to our meal and bless it, and grant

us Thy mercy."



Thus did the dumb child become a holy messenger, and, though he was

speechless, witness for God where He was entirely forgotten.



But how was it with the child? Was his coming so far any use? Was he

cured? No; the doctor could do nothing for him, and he remains

speechless still. But later he attended a deaf and dumb institution,

where he learnt reading, writing, and arithmetic, and many other useful

things. Above all, he has learnt to know for himself the Lord Jesus, and

to be resigned to the affliction God has laid upon him. He still lives,

and is a God-fearing young man, and the joy of his old parents. He has

learnt the trade of bookbinding, and can well support himself. Speaking

with his sister of the old times, he said in the deaf and dumb language,

smiling, "Ah, God has made me deaf and dumb that I should preach of the

holy Jesus."





The Indians And Deaf And Dumb The Little Demerarian facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Feedback